Tuesday, 16 August 2011

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My Patisserie [Review]


Opinion: D

Besides just being underwhelming, My Patisserie has quite an amount of distasteful amateurish filmmaking techniques adopted that brought the overall production values down drastically. Along with the exception of the tempting cake visuals that appear to be the only shots that the crew has the decency to get right, Japanese youthful idol Aoi Yu also rendered a good effort as the vibrant female lead.


Tomura (Yosuke Eguchi) was once widely lauded as a legendary patissier, but some 8 years ago he inexplicably left the field. Since that time, Tomura has lectured at culinary schools and wrote a guidebook for pastry critics.

Natsume (Yu Aoi) is a young woman who travels from Kagoshima to Tokyo to find her boyfriend. Natsume fins a job at "Patisserie Coin de rue" - a pastry shop run by husband & wife tandem Yuriko and Julian At "Patisserie Coin de rue" Natsume works with talented patissier Mariko & her fascinating creations.

Meanwhile, Tomura is now a regular at "Patisserie Coin de rue" & his encounters with Natsume brings about changes in both of their lives.


My Patisserie (a.k.a. Patisserie Coin de Rue) is probably one of the rare Japanese films I find myself having a serious distaste after walking out of its screening. Well, it wasn't all bad as the audience did get themselves treated to some delicious looking visuals of French pastries that appear to be the sole production value offered by this film.

The other main exception is the female lead actress Aoi Yu's performance.

Albeit not exceptional, Aoi gives her best at what's given and seems to be one of the few cast who cares about bringing this film to greater heights. It could be her character that's written in a way of an influential pivot, but sadly she's all I can remember from this lacklustre Japanese production.

It's one of the rare moments where I find such negative comments above of any Japanese productions loitering about in my voice. I had a great impressed mind of how there's hardly any bad Japanese films around out there (or maybe I didn't look hard enough). But that said, with several soft looking footage due to incompetent focus racking (or rather shot planning), it is difficult not to associate this optimistic tale of how a Patisserie affects the lives of others around it with the trait of amateurism.

The film's similar-titled premise is a powerful selling point by itself, where Ladies are more than elated to indulge in My Patisserie like how they get excited over a dessert course. With underwhelming emotional notes scattered about with a flustered and lost general story arc, this film's scripting feels like a lazy pile of fresh ingredients that have yet to enter the oven for baking. Even with a major star ingredient in the form of veteran Eguchi Yosuke, nothing seems to heat up. Eguchi feels like he's just strolling about with a bitter facial expression.

My Patisserie is a French pastry that only looks alluring on the outside, coated with superficial sugar imagery of French pastries, and doesn't satisfy a single bit once it enters through our mouth (or rather senses).

In fact, it feels terrible and rough on its way down my esophagus that I'd rather it go back the way it comes from.


3 comments:

  1. "My Patisserie is a French pastry that only looks alluring on the outside, coated with superficial sugar imagery of French pastries, and doesn't satisfy a single bit once it enters through our mouth" - WOW, that's a great line, buddy! It says it all, and it's so clever and unique. Bravo!

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  2. @Nebular Haha! It was by pure stroke of luck that they came to my mind in a moment of inspiration. Thank you so much George! You come up with some great lines too, you know? :D

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  3. Haven't seen this film but I don't know if I want to give it a chance after reading your review :)

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